Duggan Flanakin

Duggan Flanakin is the Director of Policy Research at the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow. A former Senior Fellow with both the Texas and Arkansas Public Policy Foundations, Mr. Flanakin has a Master's in Public Policy from Regent University. During the years he spent reporting on environmental regulation in Texas and nationwide, Mr. Flanakin authored definitive works on the creation of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and on environmental education in Texas.
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New Mexico Regulators Restrict Natural Gas Flaring

The New Mexico Oil Conservation Commission has adopted new regulations requiring oil companies, natural gas processors, and pipeline operators, to reduce flaring and venting of methane gas to just 2 percent of production by 2026.

Bankers, Insurers and Activists Assault Our Freedoms

By Duggan Flanakin Oil giant ExxonMobil’s 12-member board of directors reportedly has two new members who are climate activists backed by investor “Engine 1.” Under the headline, “Shareholders tell Exxon to eat sh*t,” G/O...

Fracking Up, Flaring Down in the United States

The flaring of natural gas has declined since the the early fourth quarter of 2020 despite a significant recovery in new oil and gas development and production.

Hawai’ians Are Turning on Offshore Wind

Despite a state mandate requiring 100 percent of Hawai’i’s electricity come from renewables by 2045, many Hawai’ian environmental activists are fighting proposed onshore and offshore industrial wind projects.

Biden Administration Suspends Minnesota Copper Mine’s Water Permit

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has suspended the discharge permit it had approved in 2019 for PolyMet’s planned NorthMet copper-nickel mine in northern Minnesota, under the 1972 Clean Water Act.

Texas Bill Would Require Wind and Solar to Pay to Ensure Electric Reliability

Senate Bill 1278, sponsored by state Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-Fort Worth), would require Texas wind and solar companies to pay the costs for backup or supplemental power needed whenever they cannot deliver electricity reliably to the grid.

Federal Court Rejects Austin’s Efforts to Rescind Pipeline Permits

Federal district judge Robert Pitman, who serves on the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas, dismissed a lawsuit filed by the City of Austin and other parties seeking to rescind permits issued to, and thus stop the operation of, Kinder Morgan Inc.’s $2.15 billion, 430-mile Permian Highway Pipeline (PHP).

Africans Deflect Biden’s Demand to End Fossil Fuel Use

Despite the Biden administration's focus on reducing fossil fuel use to fight climate change, many Africans, from heads of state to captains of industry and beyond, intend to expand, not shrink, reliance on fossil fuels to build their economies.

In the Developing World, Coal Is Still the King

China, India, and even African and other Asian nations are building coal-fired power plants and developing coal resources much faster than the U.S. can shut its own plants down. The great master plan to save the planet via a worldwide ban on fossil fuels is being systematically undermined by the hungry.

Rare Earths First? Or Last?

No Green New Deal proposed by President Biden can succeed without major increases in US mining and processing – unless he wants to make America even more dependent on China, Africa, and Russia.

Duggan Flanakin

Duggan Flanakin is the Director of Policy Research at the Committee For A Constructive Tomorrow. A former Senior Fellow with both the Texas and Arkansas Public Policy Foundations, Mr. Flanakin has a Master's in Public Policy from Regent University. During the years he spent reporting on environmental regulation in Texas and nationwide, Mr. Flanakin authored definitive works on the creation of the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and on environmental education in Texas.

Most Popular

New Mexico Regulators Restrict Natural Gas Flaring

The New Mexico Oil Conservation Commission has adopted new regulations requiring oil companies, natural gas processors, and pipeline operators, to reduce flaring and venting of methane gas to just 2 percent of production by 2026.

Bankers, Insurers and Activists Assault Our Freedoms

By Duggan Flanakin Oil giant ExxonMobil’s 12-member board of directors reportedly has two new members who are climate activists backed by investor “Engine 1.” Under the...

Fracking Up, Flaring Down in the United States

The flaring of natural gas has declined since the the early fourth quarter of 2020 despite a significant recovery in new oil and gas development and production.

Hawai’ians Are Turning on Offshore Wind

Despite a state mandate requiring 100 percent of Hawai’i’s electricity come from renewables by 2045, many Hawai’ian environmental activists are fighting proposed onshore and offshore industrial wind projects.

Biden Administration Suspends Minnesota Copper Mine’s Water Permit

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has suspended the discharge permit it had approved in 2019 for PolyMet’s planned NorthMet copper-nickel mine in northern Minnesota, under the 1972 Clean Water Act.

Texas Bill Would Require Wind and Solar to Pay to Ensure Electric Reliability

Senate Bill 1278, sponsored by state Sen. Kelly Hancock (R-Fort Worth), would require Texas wind and solar companies to pay the costs for backup or supplemental power needed whenever they cannot deliver electricity reliably to the grid.

Federal Court Rejects Austin’s Efforts to Rescind Pipeline Permits

Federal district judge Robert Pitman, who serves on the U.S. District Court for the Western District of Texas, dismissed a lawsuit filed by the City of Austin and other parties seeking to rescind permits issued to, and thus stop the operation of, Kinder Morgan Inc.’s $2.15 billion, 430-mile Permian Highway Pipeline (PHP).

Africans Deflect Biden’s Demand to End Fossil Fuel Use

Despite the Biden administration's focus on reducing fossil fuel use to fight climate change, many Africans, from heads of state to captains of industry and beyond, intend to expand, not shrink, reliance on fossil fuels to build their economies.

In the Developing World, Coal Is Still the King

China, India, and even African and other Asian nations are building coal-fired power plants and developing coal resources much faster than the U.S. can shut its own plants down. The great master plan to save the planet via a worldwide ban on fossil fuels is being systematically undermined by the hungry.

Rare Earths First? Or Last?

No Green New Deal proposed by President Biden can succeed without major increases in US mining and processing – unless he wants to make America even more dependent on China, Africa, and Russia.