H. Sterling Burnett

H. Sterling Burnett, Ph.D. is a Heartland senior fellow on environmental policy and the managing editor of Environment & Climate News.
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Latest News

Illinois Regulators Approve Dakota Access Pipeline Oil Capacity Expansion

The Illinois Commerce Commission approved a proposal for the Dakota Access Pipeline to double its capacity from 570,000 bpd to 1.1 million barrels per day.

Minnesota Regulatory Agencies Approve Enbridge Replacement Oil Pipeline

Two Minnesota regulatory agencies approved environmental permits for a replacement oil pipeline across the northern part of the state.

President Donald Trump Issues Order to Study the Economic Effects of Ending Fracking

Days before the presidential election, President Donald Trump signed an executive memorandum directing the Department of Energy to study what the economic and national security effects of banning hydraulic fracturing would be.

Kansas Utility Proposes Solar Power Access Fee

Evergy, Kansas’s largest utility, has filed a proposal with the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC), the state’s public utility regulatory agency, to charge customers with solar panels about $25 a month to pay for the cost of servicing the special needs of their homes, which both pull power from and deliver power to the electric grid.

Youth-Led Climate Change Lawsuit in Canada Dismissed by Federal Court

A Federal Court judge granted the government’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit brought on behalf of 15 young Canadians, who argued the national government was violating their charter rights by not doing enough to prevent climate change and for supporting industries which are causing climate change.

Oregon Supreme Court Rejects Youths’ Climate Lawsuit Claims

The Supreme Court of Oregon has rejected claims brought on behalf of youth plaintiffs that the state’s public trust doctrine imposes broad duties on it to protect the environment from greenhouse gas emissions.

Iowa Utility Shuts Down 46 Wind Turbines Due to Safety Concerns

Iowa-based electric utility MidAmerican Energy has idled 46 wind turbines after large blades broke off of two separate turbines in mid-October and mid-September.

Vermont Senate Overrides Governor’s Veto of Global Warming Act

With no debate or discussion before taking action, Vermont’s Senate voted to override Gov. Phil Scott’s veto of the Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA). Since the House had already voted to override Scott’s veto in late September, the bill is now law.

Federal Agency Gives Additional Support to Wind and Solar Power

A new proposal offered by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission gives additional federal support wind and solar power developers.

Federal Court Blocks California Ban on the Sale of Alligator Products

The Federal court for the Eastern District of California, based in Sacramento, has temporarily blocked a California law that would ban the sale of alligator products in the state.

H. Sterling Burnett

H. Sterling Burnett, Ph.D. is a Heartland senior fellow on environmental policy and the managing editor of Environment & Climate News.

Most Popular

Illinois Regulators Approve Dakota Access Pipeline Oil Capacity Expansion

The Illinois Commerce Commission approved a proposal for the Dakota Access Pipeline to double its capacity from 570,000 bpd to 1.1 million barrels per day.

Minnesota Regulatory Agencies Approve Enbridge Replacement Oil Pipeline

Two Minnesota regulatory agencies approved environmental permits for a replacement oil pipeline across the northern part of the state.

President Donald Trump Issues Order to Study the Economic Effects of Ending Fracking

Days before the presidential election, President Donald Trump signed an executive memorandum directing the Department of Energy to study what the economic and national security effects of banning hydraulic fracturing would be.

Kansas Utility Proposes Solar Power Access Fee

Evergy, Kansas’s largest utility, has filed a proposal with the Kansas Corporation Commission (KCC), the state’s public utility regulatory agency, to charge customers with solar panels about $25 a month to pay for the cost of servicing the special needs of their homes, which both pull power from and deliver power to the electric grid.

Youth-Led Climate Change Lawsuit in Canada Dismissed by Federal Court

A Federal Court judge granted the government’s motion to dismiss a lawsuit brought on behalf of 15 young Canadians, who argued the national government was violating their charter rights by not doing enough to prevent climate change and for supporting industries which are causing climate change.

Oregon Supreme Court Rejects Youths’ Climate Lawsuit Claims

The Supreme Court of Oregon has rejected claims brought on behalf of youth plaintiffs that the state’s public trust doctrine imposes broad duties on it to protect the environment from greenhouse gas emissions.

Iowa Utility Shuts Down 46 Wind Turbines Due to Safety Concerns

Iowa-based electric utility MidAmerican Energy has idled 46 wind turbines after large blades broke off of two separate turbines in mid-October and mid-September.

Vermont Senate Overrides Governor’s Veto of Global Warming Act

With no debate or discussion before taking action, Vermont’s Senate voted to override Gov. Phil Scott’s veto of the Global Warming Solutions Act (GWSA). Since the House had already voted to override Scott’s veto in late September, the bill is now law.

Federal Agency Gives Additional Support to Wind and Solar Power

A new proposal offered by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission gives additional federal support wind and solar power developers.

Federal Court Blocks California Ban on the Sale of Alligator Products

The Federal court for the Eastern District of California, based in Sacramento, has temporarily blocked a California law that would ban the sale of alligator products in the state.