Home Budget & Tax News New Jersey Assembly Approves Bill That Would Create Regulatory Review Commission

New Jersey Assembly Approves Bill That Would Create Regulatory Review Commission

By Todd DeFeo

State Assembly members have approved a bill to establish a regulatory review commission, legislation that business groups say will lead to relief for businesses in New Jersey.

A4810 would create the Government Efficiency and Regulatory Review (GEARR) Commission, which proponents say will lessen government regulation and support economic growth. The legislation passed by a 72-1 margin and now heads to the state Senate for consideration.

“Government should be constantly improving and always striving to be leaner and more efficient for the sake of good stewardship of taxpayer dollars and better-quality service to its constituents, and a commission like this will push us in that direction,” Christopher Emigholz, vice president of government affairs for the New Jersey Business & Industry Association (NJBIA), said in a news release.

The GEARR Commission would have nine members from the executive and legislative branches. It would meet every six months and review rules, regulations and executive orders to determine if the costs outweigh any benefits.

The commission would also provide the governor and state legislators with an annual report with recommendations on improving government rules, regulations, and executive orders that are deemed burdensome for businesses.

“COVID-19 has greatly impaired businesses and workers, who are making an effort to adapt to a new normal,” Assemblywoman Nancy Pinkin, D-Middlesex, said in a statement after the Assembly Commerce and Economic Development Committee approved the legislation. “Now more than ever, the people of New Jersey need effective rules and regulations to help save taxpayer money and regain economic prosperity.

“We must ensure people have the ability for monetary growth and, by identifying economic areas in need, the Commission could create better efficiencies to lower costs and save taxpayer money,” Pinkin added.

Pinkin co-sponsored the legislation with Assemblywomen Valerie Vainieri Huttle, D-Bergen, and Carol A. Murphy, D-Burlington. The bill is identical to S441 in the state Senate.

 

Originally published by The Center Square. Republished with permission.

Todd DeFeo
The Center Square Contributor

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